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  • What Do You Wear to a Physical Therapy Appointment?

    If you are having difficulty with normal functional mobility after surgery, injury, or illness, then you may benefit from working with a physical therapist during your recovery. If you've been referred to physical therapy (PT), you likely have many questions about what to expect and how to prepare.

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  • Is Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Appropriate for Patients Under Age 60?

    Dr. Paul Cagle and Dr. Brad Parsons answer ICJR’s questions about their study evaluating long-term survivorship in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis who were younger than age 60 at the time of total shoulder arthroplasty.

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  • What to know about tendinitis

    Tendinitis — also known as tendonitis — is the inflammation of a tendon. It usually happens when a person overuses or injures a tendon during physical activity.

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  • Palmaris or hamstring tendon graft for UCL reconstruction?

    According to a new systematic literature review, patients who receive palmaris grafts are slightly more likely to return to sport or return-to-same level than patients who had received hamstring tendon grafts.

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  • The benefits of RA physical therapy for joint health

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that can impact many different organs and joints in the body. Unfortunately, this form of arthritis is progressive, and the pain and functional limitations associated with it tend to worsen over time. That said, several effective treatment options, including physical therapy (PT), can help manage the condition’s symptoms.

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  • Staging of osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow based on pathological progression in the partially detached articular fragment

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is considered to show the following stages of pathological progression: IA, nearly normal-cartilaginous; IB, deteriorated-cartilaginous; IIA, cartilage-ossifying; and IIB, cartilage-osteonecrotic. However, the validity of this pathological staging for OCD has yet to be confirmed in a large number of cases.

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  • Acetaminophen’s role in pain management after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Including acetaminophen for pain management prior to and after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can significantly reduce opioid consumption and improve patient satisfaction postoperatively. Not only that, but patients who take acetaminophen perioperative can also have better pain control, even while consuming fewer opioids.

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  • What is water on the knee?

    Knee effusion, sometimes called water on the knee, occurs when excess fluid accumulates in or around the knee joint. Common causes include arthritis and injury to the ligaments or meniscus, which is cartilage in the knee.

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  • In terms of glenoid defects, does size matter?

    Apparently so. A new study looking at the postoperative recurrence rate after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair found that it was lower in male competitive rugby and American football players with a large glenoid defect, in fact 3x lower, than in those with a small glenoid defect.

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  • Why Triathletes Should Swim Different Strokes

    Shoulder health is a big deal for swimmers and triathletes. Overuse injuries due to muscular imbalances are common, painful, keep you from training, and can be expensive to treat. Swimming other strokes gives you an opportunity to strengthen other parts of the shoulder by using different movements

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